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Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)
, as of right now china owns $1.15 trillion of our debt. then, number two on the list, is japan with $1.13 trillion of our debt. now, this is interesting. out of this debt number three on the list is opec. opec is an entity. that's the countries of ecuador and venezuela and india and bahrain and iran and iraq and kuwait and amman and qatar and saudi arabia and the u.a.e., algeria, ga been a, -- gabon, nigeria. they're now number three on the list and they own $267 billion of our debt. brazil comes in at number four, $250.5 billion. and then number five on the list, new to the list, the top five list, the caribbean banking centers. now own $240.4 billion of u.s. debt. by the way, caribbean banking centers are the bahamas, bermuda, cayman islands, netherlands and panama. this is who owns us. this is who owns our debt. and this is why on this side of the aisle, what we continue to say is the spending has to be dealt with. we have seen -- we've heard from everybody. we are hearing from economists all around the globe. and they repeatedly say what we are saying, what we've been saying for ye
for the group. he was promoted second-in-command earlier this year. >>> back to the economy now, china apparently going on an american spending spree. a chinese company agreed to buy a big chunk of insurance giant aig for more than $4 billion after the company got a huge bailout during the u.s. financial crisis. that is not the only bargain that china is picking up from u.s. taxpayers lately. stuart varney on this morning, head of "varney & company" on fox business network. good morning, stuart. good to see you. >> good morning, martha. martha: they're gobbling up our assets in many ways . what do you make of it. >> they are spending the money they have got buying american assets cheap. you mentioned aig. a chinese company is paying $4 billion for aig's plane leasing business. aig remember got $189 billion as a bailout fund that was back in september of 2008. the taxpayers still are the largest shareholder in aig. we sold the plane leasing business to china cheap. second item, a 123 batteries, americans taxpayers gave that company $249 million in grants and another 250 million in tax s
't an accord in congress. >> we will always have china. manufacturing pmi data from last night is the best in 21 months. can we finally say the chinese economy has been stabilized. >> but of course, we start in washington. as you know, congress comes back today. the house gaveling into session now with legislative business starting at 10:00 a.m. the senate returns at 11:00 a.m. eastern. there are only a few hours left to get a deal done. eamon? >> you're already hearing people talk the way they talk on new year's day. a lot of people wish they could go back in time and do things differently. that's the way people are talking in washington about this fiscal cliff. feeling as if this thing suddenly got off the rails. take a listen to mitch mcconnell last night talking about the pace of the negotiations here and the frustration that he's experienced going through all of this over the weekend. take a listen. >> now, i'm concerned about the lack of urgency here. like we all know we're running out of time. this is far too much at stake for political gamesmanship. we need to protect the american
to end the civil war in syria. now, remember, both russia and china have blocked u.n. attempts to force out the assad regime. now the russians say they are willing to meet with the syrian opposition. it could open the door for real u.n. action on the ground, action that could mean american involvement. we've got more details in a live report in just a minute. >>> but also, russia's president formally saying no to americans who want to adopt russian children. it is a heartbreaking development for hundreds of americans who are trying to adopt children from russian orphana orphanages. that is happening right now. president vladimir putin signed the adoption ban today. sadly, more than 50 americans who were in the final stages of adopting russian children, they are not going to be able to. and while those families certainly hoping that they're going to allow these adoptions to go through, the country's child rights commissioner says that those kids are going to stay in russia. so why are the russians doing this? the ban is considered a payback of sorts for an american law that was passed tw
. if apple gets approval for the china mobile contract, and the television, the smart television which are both expected, anticipated this year, we're looking for earnings this coming year of $50. $50 times 14 is $700 price target. we have a $720 price target, bill. so we've put apple, qualcomm, microsoft, oracle, and your big club stocks. all of those have done well this year. the big winners of this month, the banks have come on super strong. china ma and japan. and i think you can start to nibble a little on china and japan, as well. >> michael, is there an argument to be made that you don't want to touch stocks right now until you have some clarity on this fiscal cliff? just in case we see a big sell-off? >> there is, but i'll argue, too, that you're talking about $600 billion being sucked out of the economy next year. the s&p made $20 trillion. while we are looking at the fiscal cliff countdown, there is another countdown to new all-year highs when the dow is close to the prior peak around 600% from here. investors should be looking overseas. you want to look where there is no fis
reports on police officers in china, and their accusations of widespread corruption by local officials. and jeffrey brown samples the poetry about greece's financial woes and its austerity measures. >> we'll hock the person to buy our bread. if you believe the headlines, then we're sunk. greece downgraded deeper into junk. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour.n >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: much of the world paused today to observe christmas. the day brought all the traditional rites of faith for christians and a new urgency to calls for calm in the troubled corners of the globe. thousands of the fait
have as in this for a while. i think there is always china, europe, and the congress that can miss this up. i think it is hard to stop this recovery. we have done everything we can to do it. we can do it again if we try hard. i think we will not succeed this time. >> we have not talked about the creation yet, which polling showed is a major concern for americans. for the long-term unemployed who have been left behind a little bit and then to the economic recovery, do you feel like the president and congress is doing enough to address the problem? what politically and realistically could be done in the next four years? >> i think the president is committed to this. i think he would like to see an extension of unemployment insurance. he would like to see it if possible an extension of the payroll tax cut. we just released a $4 trillion deficit revenue plan that calls for four and a billion dollars in short-term stimulus. we think there is a need for a infrastructure and roads and bridges. we think it has to happen sometime in the next 20 years. we have a situation with incredibly low
vacuum cleaner. sucking into the united states the net exports of europe, japan, and lately china. thus providing exporters -- germany, japan, or china -- with the requisite demand necessary. to keep the factories going. so, the ever expanding trade deficit was not an accident. it was a very clever way of replacing one that surplus recycling system with another. the first one, it was one where america had a surplus and america decided instead of doing what germany is doing at the moment -- which is cutting its nose to spite its face, and thereby entering into recession by cutting, cutting, cutting -- volcker and kissinger initially, and then volcker as the head of the fed had a different idea. we are going to expand our dominance and our wealth by expanding our deficit and using our deficits to provide the rest of the world with the demand which is necessary to grow their economies, even at the expense of ours. and who is going to pay for the deficit? if i have an ever-expanding deficit, the bank tells me it is game over. but if you are the united states of america and you have the rese
on housing and employment data, the global economy continues fragile with the european debt crisis and china i in in. >> rogoff is a professor of public policy and economics at harvard, he is a coauthor of the best selling book, this time is different, eight centuries of financial folly, many consider it to be the authoritative text on the impact of financial crisis around the world. i am pleased to have ken rogoff back on this program. welcome. >> thank you, charlie. >> rose: let me start big, if i may. so i mean, how do you see as we enter a new year the global economy? >> well, to state the obvious, everybody is growing more slowly than they would like to, if at all. europe is basically flat, the u.s. is improving, but it is not exactly galloping and, you know, we are entering probably a weak quarter where people are hoping it will be stronger over the course of the year, china is slowing some and in general all of the emerging markets are slower than they were most of them india has slowed dramatically, brazil is slow, so yes, indeed it is a fragile situation, when the u.s. is one of the
forces. itn's john sparks reports on police officers in china, and their accusations of widespread corruption by local officials. and jeffrey brown samples the poetry about greece's financial woes and its austerity measures. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: the election commission in egypt confirmed today the new constitution won nearly 64% of the vote in a referendum. the panel also reported turnout was just a third of the country's 52 million registered voters. president mohammed morsi and his muslim brotherhood backed the draft constitution. opponents warned it paves the way for islamic rule and curbs on civil liberties. the six persian gulf arab nations demanded an end to what they called iranian interference. they issued a statement today at the end of the gulf cooperation council's annual summit. the statement gave no details. the six u.s. allied countries, also called for swift international action to end the bloodshed in syria. in central asia, a military plane crashed early this morning in kazakhstan killin
with a bunch of allies who supported him. >> i've been reading kissinger's book on china, but he raises's broader question which is important. unfathomable as it is to americans there are parts of the world where they do not believe in alienable rights, right? they don't believe in human rights in the way that we do. >> exactly. and when we try to impose it on them they consider it a violation of their sovereignty. >> exactly. >> china feels that way often. russia, same thing. how far do we go in promoting human rights? the trade off that we'll get here. the law gets passed and human rights violators in russia can't come year and now 1,000 children don't come to the united states and people who want them don't get them. >> my personal view, no. they're glad to take our money and they've long had to put their money overseas, but they do not want human rights promotion and we've seen that inside russia and we've seen that against the crockdown on the internet and this is just the latest interaction of the series of things going back for more than a year against the political opposition an
their livelihoods when the factory across the street from us closes their doors in november, moving to china, taking around 170 jobs with them. >> the bain capital board has made their decision. the cdo has made his decision. -- ceo has made his decision. we believe the only person in the world who can stop these jobs from the move is mitt romney. >> in the latest sign of global warming, guys in the arctic has shrunk to its smallest area since record-keeping began. >> there are people who rely on the arctic ocean. if the ice melts, it is a scary thought. it is who we are, is where the animals migrate. my elders, the community elders rely on their vitamins, the traditional foods that the ocean supplies. >> i'm sorry, i will stop the subsidy to pbs and other things. i love big bird, i like you, too, but i'm not going to keep on spending money to borrow from china to pay for. >> labor protests against the largest private employer, walmart, is expanded to 28 stores in 12 states. organizers describe the action as the first retail workers' strike in walmart's history. >> i work in the warehouse in illinoi
? >> by the way, on that china point, wind energy relies on precious metals, rare either metals and china is the chief production of that. some analysts say we'll be more reliant as we go more and more wind power, more reliant on the chinese mining industry to get rare earth metals that we need, rare earth metals. sandra: what are we doing here? the taxpayers have got to question this. this is their hard-earned dollars at work. the vetting process by the obama administration has not been all that great when investing in these companies. >> no. we've seen 80% of companies had ties with democratic donors with obama, connections, cronyism. wind produces 2.3% of the electricity. 1.3% of the global electricity. this is something that is, this was the, energy of the future back in the 1970s, 35 years ago. and it hasn't produced. every year they extend, not every year but extend the production tax credits for the wind power and the bottom line is, the wind power, always say prosperity is just around the corner. self-reliance is just around the corner. it doesn't happen. whoo we're seeing more an
to year. it is hard to estimate countries like china because they are now pricing things the same way. they have large land forces and they are not deployed across the world. submarines and missiles. china is probably number one on the list. host: this from twitter. guest: that refers to overseas contingency operations. this is a fund that paid for the wars in iraq. it is about $88 billion in that account. there is a pentagon and washington funny math. some people say if the project out, we will save all this money. i wrote a report about saving $1 trillion. most of our troops will be out of afghanistan by 2014. nobody expects it will spend this level of money going out the long term in the future. so the $1 trillion in savings is money we would not have spent anyway. there are some built-in drawdowns in the defense department. in.se were built an about $487 billion over 10 years. they are coming back down. about 100,000 or so and they are built into the system. the pentagon is looking at things that way. host: roger in texas, republican caller. go ahead. caller: i am amazed i got thr
. if you look at the facts, 32% of our manufacturing base has been gutted and sold to china, india, any foreign country that has cheap labor. the top patriotic american companies are parking their profits and offshore accounts so they do not have to pay a fair share of their taxes. the bottom line is since the late '70s, the wealthiest 2% in this country are making 25 times their wealth that they made a black -- back then. there are only paying 40% more in taxes. this country is doomed if we do not start putting terrace of the imports coming into this country. the republican party is selling you an outright lie. thank you. host: let's show you a facebook posting. the economist and professor at the university of maryland will be with us and about 25 minutes or so. he will take your calls and give you his economic outlook for 2013. he has written a lot on the matter. from west virginia, independent. caller: is, sir. i would just like to say that i am not very optimistic above the future of the united states right now. we are in so much that it is pathetic. our budget is way over. this pre
. but competitors in china are, rush show were trading on a daily basis. -- my competitors in china and russia work training. this is a position of irritation of a triple jump. i was like a robot in the sense that everything i was doing, the hours i was putting in it, the morning, the afternoon, the evening, i trained all they basically. my first session, 10:00, i was basically of the rank by nine and my last session would be at 6:00-6:30. then i would go to the gym. i look back, no wonder i was in really good shape. >> where did that drive? how did that drive? where do you get that drive? >> we were talking earlier about the role of parents. when you had mentioned the tiger mom or the tiger parents, we did not have tiger parents. they were there to support me and be there in times when i needed a push culminated motivation. it is just one of those things when you have a passion and a vision. you do not see anything else. that is what drives you every day. >> you just got engaged. are you going to be a tiger mom. [laughter] >> looking at the way i was raised with a set of rules and just the way my
expensive to do business in countries like china. our workers have become even more productive. our energy costs are starting to go down here in the united states. and we still have the largest market. so when you factor in everything, it makes sense to invest here, in america. and that's one of the reasons why american manufacturing is growing at the fastest pace since the 1990s. and thanks in part to that boost in manufacturing, four years after the worst economic crisis of our lifetimes, our economy is growing again. our businesses have created more than 5.5 million new jobs over the past 33 months. so we're making progress. [applause] we're moving in the right direction. we're going forward. so what we need to do is simple. we need to keep going. we need to keep going forward. we should do everything we can to keep creating good middle- class jobs that help folks rebuild security for their families. [applause] and we should do everything we can to encourage companies like daimler to keep investing in american workers. and by the way, what we shouldn't do -- i just got to say this -- wh
can see, with the kospi up the most, 1.5 points. >> strong nebs out of china which suggest maybe the economy is rebounding more than expected. >> the exports. >> yeah. >> among the catalyst in asia trading today, economic stats out of china. export growths slowed sharply to 2.9% in december. that news j underscores the global headwinds dragging on the economy. but the chinese economy is showing solid signs of a pick up in domestic activity. industrial output was stronger than expected. the country has been saying for years it needs to shift a little bit from the export model the internal consumption. let their middle class grow and not be nearly as dependent on exports. and china's oil demand in november surpassed 10 million barrels per day for the first time ever. the country's crude imports rose to the second highest daily rate on record. analysts say this is further evidence of the chinese recover. and i saw this story on -- every once in a while i check tweeting. >> i saw it on google, too. kayla tausche reporting -- >> kayla beat nick dunn. >> nick dunn was quoting kayla. >>
jimmy carter is in china this week where today he met with the new communist leader to discuss a wide range of controversial chinese policies. with him, of course, roseland carter as well. >>> in pakistan hundreds of students rallied against naming a college against malala, the activist school girl that was shot by a taliban gunman in october. according to pakistani government officials, students are concerned that naming the college after malala will cause a security threat to them. >>> in oregon today officials say that jacob tyler roberts, the 22-year-old gunman who killed two people and seriously wounded a 15-year-old girl before taking his own life in an oregon mall on tuesday knew none of his victims. police say that roberts acted alone, using a semi-automatic rifle that he had stolen the day before. the day before the shooting rampage at that crowded mall. roberts had no significant criminal record. authorities said other than a few speeding tickets. >>> that tragedy in oregon is only the latest in a series of mass shugts, and people ask could tighter gun laws have prevented th
were running congress when we had a like nafta, china's most favorite nation status, the jvc, the world trade organization. all these trade deals people claim were going to bring jobs to the united states and in every case, the jobs left.
in the world paying big in chin. in china, individuals cannot own any arms. we have the same kinds of violent situations going on. in connecticut they had some of the strongest gun-control laws in the country and it still occurred there. let's look at the problems that caused this to occur. let's focus on solving those problems instead of just saying it is guns. right now today in connecticut, also weapons -- an assault weapon is a machine gun. they are already controlled. someone cannot just go to the store and buy an assault weapon today. it is not about clips or number of rounds in a gun. we have to focus upon those problems that caused this young man to snap, to kill his mom. i cannot imagine that. and then go and kill six-year oldss. the guns did not make him do that. the guns were not evil. he is evil, his act is evil. we need to deal with what caused the problems. i don't think the guns caused it. host: back to your home state of georgia, james is on the phone on the independent line. caller: just a few things. georgia is last on the bottom of the education. you are doing nothing to he
sachs to buy from neutral. citing increased potential for yum's operations in china. although, that's what we talk about all the time. kfc in china. that's the growth in their, i think isn't yum bigger than mcdonald's in terms of total number? >> yeah. >> i think subway is, too. research -- >> they don't even call it kentucky tried anymore. >> kfc. >> and it's really chicken. >> that's uncalled for. what do you think it is, cat? that is uncalled for. >> this is all i'll say. >> tastes like chicken. >> yes, it's chicken! if david novak -- >> taco bell. >> yeah, taco bell. >> is that really meat? is that your next -- >> no. all right. the restaurant -- research in motion, rim shares coming off a seven-month high on news that the u.s. immigrations and customs enforcement agent are going to use the blackberry 10 on a trial basis. that is on news, did you see this, that the agency is going to ditch the iphone in favor -- >> okay, so why? >> i don't know. i just want to say, so blackberry was one of the sponsors of the thing yesterday, at the dealbook conference and they showed off the bl
. take shoes in 1960, 98% of the choose were made in the u.s. 252%. wages in china are increasing. in the next two years consultants believe the u.s. will reshore about 3 billion in u.s. jobs as the wage differential shrinks making us more competitive. the u.s. maintains a edge in neurospace, heavy equipment world wide. american products have a reputation for quality and durability. while people are willing to pay more than that part of it is education. they say we need to rebrand u.s. goods in the mind of u.s. consumers as a value purchase. kelly: let's bring americans back by buying and investing in america. >> reporter: if there was a store for it i think probably more of us would do it. kelly: let's go out and create a business. jaime: means jobs. definitely. local police are calling this bon of the strangest cases ever. two young men vanish without a trace in an ideal i can new england river town. as we get reports that syria may have crossed president obama's red line by using chemical weapons within its borders we'll debate what the u.s. could do, if anything, in we are for
canceling each other out. how the president -- whoever the president might be -- do anything? you have china -- finding it impossible to provide a replacement for the demand that the west has done away with. so, i do not have an answer for your question. bewilderment. >> my question is about consumer demand and the extent to which the old system depended on it. if we do not have it to the same degree, could there possibly be a new economy? i cannot know how to say all of these in the right economic terms. i will say what i am thinking and see what you make out of it. its teams like all the economy's got to a point where it had to be based on growth. it could not just be sustainable. it had to grow. and that meant more consumers. so, then, that led to a lot of things ecologically that were not good for the earth's, things that people did to maximize profits. so, that is one thing. is there the possibility there might be a new economy that is not based on growth? second, if you do not have consumer demand at the same level that he used to -- and of course, i think that is why. one of the piece
about how china is taking over. what we need to make some decisions that is going to help the america people, corporate america, middle-class america, those individuals that are not in the capacity whatever so ever, i expect our elected officials to getting together, work this thing out, do the right thing, quit the fighting and come up with a solution even if they have to go back after the fact and just get things the way they are supposed to be. >> some of the expectations there from willard. we're going to go on to cal on the republicans line in tennessee. what do you think of the fiscal cliff and where the negotiations are so far? >> i think they ought to go over the fiscal cliff. we have people like that that are on the government bill too long. they are sucking the tit of the federal government. i think everyone should pay their fair share. we have almost a $17 billion national debt. not only, the rich but everyone should pay their fair share. we also need some spending cuts too. $3 for every $1. if you don't do this we're going top find ourselfs in a situation -- you want to ta
. >>> "the boston globe," china's largest auto manufacturer has the winning bid for a a123, a brumt battery maker based in the u.s. the company received $133 million in federal stimulus grngrnt grants before going under. republicans called the case a textbook example of wasted stimulus money. >>> "usa today," controversy surrounding the korean pop sensation psy. he performed last night at the christmas in washington concert with the president and his family in attendance. he has that dance, you know? >> you know, everybody, like, sends me videos of them doing this. i have no idea what it is. >> "gangnam style." >> is that how you say it? >> yeah. >> oh, you know what? i prefer to be out of it on this one. >> so this was just days after video surfaced of him using inflammatory anti-american language and leading anti-u.s. protests at a concert in 2004 amid the heat of the iraq war. the song, which is a cover called for killing, quote, yankees. on friday psy issued an apology saying he understands american servicemen's sacrifices and regrets using the inflammatory language. >> it was really ha
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)